High Quality Development

Broadwater Gardens will be a high-quality development of 289 new open market and affordable homes. The homes will be a mixture of one to four bedrooms and consist of apartment blocks and townhouses. The apartment blocks will vary in height and scale between 4 and 9 storeys making efficient use of the space on the site.

The buildings will ‘step up’ gradually to ensure they blend with neighbouring architecture and the environment. Two-thirds of the development area will be open space with individually designed courtyard gardens, play areas, a community hub, gym and café.

The landscaping will create a series of communal gardens and interconnected landscaped courtyards, shielded from railway noise.

The courtyard blocks are separated via an east - west garden ensuring maximum daylight and sunlight penetration to the landscaped areas throughout the day. The southern block’s courtyard opens to the allotments, providing extensive views for the residents.

Each courtyard will have a unique identity with areas set aside for play and quiet relaxation.

A community use gym and coffee shop are proposed at ground floor level, overlooking the main central garden. This will act as a local hub providing a place for residents to meet, chat and share a coffee.

Our proposals would regenerate this derelict brownfield site, in a sustainable location in the heart of Welwyn Garden City, and bring it back into use by the community. As you can see from the before and after images below, our proposals will reduce the overall massing on the site, providing new homes and facilities for the wider community.

If you’d like to look at all of the proposals in more detail, then you can download all of the current site layout plans here.

Sustainable living

The site is just 10 minutes’ walk from the town centre and will play a pivotal role in connecting the existing residential areas to the new neighbouring ‘Wheat Quarter’ development and the town centre beyond.

The Wheat Quarter, currently under construction, provides the potential to create a much shorter walking route to the station and town centre. The potential also exists to extend this route beyond the site to the neighbouring residential properties in Broadwater Crescent.

We know that parking is an important factor in a development like this which is close to the train station, other public transport, and the town centre. We’re using and extending the basement car parking area which leaves much more space at ground floor level for landscaping. We’ve allocated 188 parking spaces for residents – that’s 0.63 spaces per home. The reduction in parking supports Welwyn Hatfield Borough Council’s reaction to the climate emergency. Visitor cycle stands located within the landscaping will promote greener transport methods into the site, deterring the use of cars further. We anticipate that only half of the residents will use a car and that this will be ample parking provision for all of the homes.

We will also provide 289 cycle parking spaces.

Public Transport

A bus stop is located at the entrance to the site. The 601 provides regular access to Welwyn Garden City, Hatfield, St Albans and Borehamwood with further routes available on Bridge Street, 5 minutes’ walk away.

Trains provide access to the Thameslink and Great Northern network.

A series of buildings and places around Welwyn Garden City we’ve taken inspiration from

Design Inspiration: Garden Cities

How the Garden City Movement influenced our design

Sir Ebenezer Howard published his book ‘Garden Cities of To-morrow’ in 1902 which first proposed the Garden City Movement; a series of new planning principles for the urban design of cities.

The fundamental principle of the movement was self- sufficient communities within green belt areas that had proportioned areas for housing, industry, agriculture and commerce.

Welwyn Garden City is famed for its central grand landscaped boulevard and network of green spaces that are integral to the layout and design of the garden city.

These principles are central to the design ethos of the scheme. Broadwater Gardens has been designed to improve the existing site by creating permeability, reducing the bulk of the current laboratory buildings, and by providing an aesthetically pleasing landscape-driven residential development. The scheme consists of four apartment blocks and eight townhouses, and each has its own character which has been inspired by both the Welwyn Garden City architecture and the locally celebrated art deco modernist structures; such as the Roche and Shredded Wheat buildings.

Design Inspiration: Garden Cities

How the Garden City Movement influenced our design

Sir Ebenezer Howard published his book ‘Garden Cities of To-morrow’ in 1902 which first proposed the Garden City Movement; a series of new planning principles for the urban design of cities.

The fundamental principle of the movement was self- sufficient communities within green belt areas that had proportioned areas for housing, industry, agriculture and commerce.

Welwyn Garden City is famed for its central grand landscaped boulevard and network of green spaces that are integral to the layout and design of the garden city.

These principles are central to the design ethos of the scheme. Broadwater Gardens has been designed to improve the existing site by creating permeability, reducing the bulk of the current laboratory buildings, and by providing an aesthetically pleasing landscape-driven residential development. The scheme consists of four apartment blocks and eight townhouses, and each has its own character which has been inspired by both the Welwyn Garden City architecture and the locally celebrated art deco modernist structures; such as the Roche and Shredded Wheat buildings.

A series of buildings and places around Welwyn Garden City we’ve taken inspiration from

Key architectural features range from industrial black framed windows and art deco curves, to the more domestic mansard roofs and bronze dormers. The balance between the industrial and residential aesthetics is representative of the site location, it being within the industrial region of Welwyn and yet neighbouring a number of residential developments. The material palette of red multi brick, white brick and terracotta tile, ensures that the scheme blends well within its context whilst elevating the area through contemporary design. Broadwater Gardens will not only be a great place to live, but will also improve the area for its neighbours by creating leafy views through the site, where previously there were none, and by increasing the connectivity to other destinations in Welwyn.